The Blue Lagoon is one of the most iconic landmarks in Iceland and it might also be one of the most controversial among visitors. Everyone has an opinion on whether visiting the thermal pool is worthwhile.
Is the Blue Lagoon over-rated? too expensive? or a unique steaming wonderland?
Well I wasn’t going to travel halfway around the world visit Iceland for a week and then not visit this place I had dreamed about seeing for so many years.
But children under 2 years old are not permitted to swim in Iceland’s most popular hot pool and we were travelling with an 18 month old.

How to visit the Blue Lagoon in Iceland with a baby #Iceland Click To Tweet

Visit the blue lagoon in Iceland with your baby, toddler or child.

SO HOW CAN YOU VISIT THE BLUE LAGOON WITH A BABY?

1. BUY TICKETS AHEAD OF TIME

  • Pre booking is required at the Blue Lagoon and tickets sell out fast.
  • You need to choose your entry time, you have an hour window to enter.
  • You can then stay in the pool as long as you like until closing (around 10pm).
  • The entry fee starts at 6100ISK (around 50 Euro) and increases depending on the availability.
  • 3pm is the most popular entry time with early morning and after 8pm the least popular.

It is free for children aged between 2 and 13 to visit the Blue Lagoon but you still need to book them a ticket.

When should I book?

Book as soon as you have finalised your Iceland travel dates. Tickets come online 6 months ahead of time.

The Blue Lagoon is near the airport so visiting before your departure flight is convenient. You can also store your luggage at the Blue Lagoon, the luggage storage in the car park.

2. GETTING TO THE BLUE LAGOON

  • By Car: There is a large car park with free parking. The drive is approximately 50 minutes from Reykjavik and 20 minutes from the airport.
  • By Bus: Take a bus from BSÍ Bus Terminal in Reykjavik or at Keflavík International Airport. You can find the Blue Lagoon schedule here.
  • By Taxi: Taxis are readily available at the airport and Blue Lagoon staff will call one on your behalf when you depart.
  • By Shuttle: You can book a door to door transfer when you buy your Blue Lagoon ticket or via the Reykjavik excursions website. 

It is compulsory for children to ride in a car seat in Iceland. The bus and taxi companies will provide a car seat if requested at the time of booking.

3. ARRIVE ON TIME

You can arrive any time within the hour that you have booked.  Join the queue and get your wristbands.
Your wristbands act as an electronic key to the lockers; you can also charge any drinks to the band and pay when you leave.

What happens if you are late?

It is at the discretion of the Blue Lagoon staff if they will allow entry and they advise to call if you are unable to make the allotted time.

4. WHERE YOU CAN GO IN THE BLUE LAGOON WITH A BABY

For those that are travelling in a group and some of the group can’t enter the pool, such as when travelling with a baby or toddler, the non-swimmers are still permitted to enter the restaurants and cafes.  Since there is no time limit on how long you can stay at the pool, parents can take turns staying with the baby, while the other swims.

If you are lucky enough to have a baby that sleeps well in a stroller you could consider trying the following:

Continue past the reception area and head towards the right. There is a courtyard area that can be accessed by the public, this has direct access to the pool. You can take a stroller onto the area.
This is a good spot to take photos of the pool as well.
If you have a baby that will happily nap in the stroller then you could consider putting them to sleep while one adult changes and enters the pool, the swimmer can move around the area in the pool directly next to the courtyard and then supervise the baby while the other adult got changed and entered the pool.  I have not done this so can make no guarantee that this is an option but when we visited this seemed like it would be a possibility.Blue Lagoon Baby, kid, child, family, Iceland

Check out these tips for visiting the Blue Lagoon with kids #Iceland Click To Tweet

5. FINAL TIPS FOR VISITING THE BLUE LAGOON WITH CHILDREN

  • You must shower naked before putting your swimsuit on. There are private shower stalls if you prefer privacy.
  • The entrance to the pool is conveniently inside so don’t worry that you will be walking outdoors before getting in, you slip into the pool and then head out a door in the water to access the outside.
  • Children that aren’t toilet trained will need to wear a swim diaper. Everything is more expensive in Iceland so bring one from home.
  • Children aged 2-13 are free, one adult is permitted to supervise only 2 children so bear that in mind if you have a lot of kids.
  • The silica in the water can make your hair very stiff so bring conditioner and put a layer of conditioner on your hair (don’t rinse it off) before entering the pool, bring a no-tears formula for the kids.
  • You can rent towels but to save money bring your own. We like to travel with a couple of light weight travel towels.
  • Bring a couple of drink bottles filled with water and leave them in your locker to re-hydrate every hour.
  • Be sure to head to the bucket of mud and have a mud mask, it is a good laugh and leaves your skin silky smooth.
  • Children under 8 need to wear floatation aids even if they can swim, these are provided, you’ll find them as you head to the pool out of the changing rooms.
  • If you are going in winter take a warm hat to wear in the pool.
  • If you want to eat at the Lava restaurant after your swim (I highly recommend it) book ahead of time.
  • Don’t forget the sunblock if you are visiting in the summer months.

If you visit the Blue Lagoon with a baby let me know how you get along and any other tips you might have for other readers.

If you enjoy this article please share it with your friends and family.

PIN IT:

Visiting the Blue Lagoon is a must do if you are in Iceland. Here is how you can do it with a baby? Also includes tips for visiting with toddlers and older kids. #Iceland #Familytravel

Write A Comment